Avoid Overdue Fines: Renew Online!

Do you have a library book coming due, but need it a little bit longer?  Don’t rack up late fees, renew online! Just follow these easy steps:

1.  From the library website, click the Renew Books button

Renew Books

 

 

2. Enter your 14-digit bar code number found on your UDM ID card

 Tommy Titan ID with circleBarcode with arrow

3. Check the box on the left of the book you want to renew

Renew shot

 

4. Click the Renew button

Renew button

…and now you don’t have to worry for another 28 days!

Renew screen

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sandra Wilson, Librarian

 

Study while you wait: NCSBN’s Medication Flashcards Mobile App

Make the most of your time while standing in line or waiting for an appointment… study! The National Council of the State Boards of NursingNCSBN Learning Extension Medication Flashcards has a free app that will help you study drug information in preparation for the NCLEX exam or a pharmacology exam. The app is only available for the iphone and ipad at this time, but an Android version is due for release next month (April 2015).

Benzo flashcard with circle

The app uses a flashcard format. Medications are grouped into categories (eg. anti-psychotics, beta blockers, lipid-lowering agents, etc.) or they can be searched by specific drug.

Tap the screen to flip the card. The back of the flashcard contains:

  • generic and brand names of drugs that fall into that category
  • drug uses along with an overview of the mechanism of action
  • information that is “nice to know” (eg. do not discontinue the medication suddenly), “good to know” (eg. exposure to sunlight may cause a severe sunburn), and “really important to know” (eg. may cause confusion and hallucinations and should be avoided in clients over 70).

There is an option to “Flag” what you don’t know or indicate that you “Got it” with the drugs that you are comfortable with. You can then come back and focus on the flagged medications.

Most of us have our smartphones with us most all the time. So as a study aid, NCSBN’s Flashcards are conveniently at hand. Plus, the price is right!

Jill Turner, Librarian

Primary vs. Secondary Sources

german docOccasionally one of your professors may ask you to write a paper citing primary sources. A primary source is a document, recording or physical object that conveys a first-hand account or direct evidence of an event or time period. Primary sources also include publications (often journal articles) which report results of or data from original research. (Note: digital, microform or published copies of original materials can still be considered primary sources as long as their content is unchanged)

Primary sources can include:

  • Diaries, interviews, memoirs, oral histories, and letters from first-hand observers
  • Video and sound recordings and photographs
  • Government documents such as birth or marriage certificates, census records, and trial transcripts
  • Maps
  • Physical artifacts such as medals, clothing,and tapestries
  • Survey research such as market surveys or opinion polls
  • Journal articles revealing the results of original research

Secondary sources are produced after an event occurs by someone who was not present during the event. They often cite primary sources and attempt to interpret, evaluate or analyze original sources.

Examples of Secondary sources include:

  • History textbooks
  • Encyclopedias
  • Commentaries, criticisms and analyses
  • Biographies and bibliographies

To find primary sources in the library catalog, do a keyword search for your topic and add one of the following words:

  • Diary
  • Memoir
  • Autobiography
  • Correspondence
  • Personal narrative
  • Speech
  • Oral history
  • Interview
  • Manuscript
  • Ask one of the friendly librarians if you need additional help.

    Jill Spreitzer, Librarian

Come Out, Come Out Wherever You Are

healthcare marketingUsing the UDM Library catalog can be a frustrating experience when it works too well and retrieves thousands of matches for your search. That’s why there are so many different tools and tricks for refining your search, and why librarians are experts at focusing your search to retrieve a manageable list of results.

But the reverse problem often occurs as well. You know darn well that book is in the catalog somewhere. You found it before. Where is it now?

Leaving aside the remote possibilities that the book has been withdrawn from the collection, there are a number of other things that can go wrong. Ironically, these often happen out of good motives.

For example, limiting the scope of your search is generally helpful. But let’s say you generally spend your free time at the McNichols Campus Library (and who doesn’t?), and have gotten used to always limiting your searches to materials held there. By doing so, you are automatically excluding all electronic books from your search results, since the catalog does not recognize them as part of the McNichols collection. Search limits should be treated like antibiotics and used if they are necessary, not just because they are there.

Misspellings are an obvious cause of empty search results, and there are constant reminders to check your spelling, usually in the voice of your first grade teacher. But sometimes just plain spelling gets you in trouble.

Here’s a very simple title to find. I assure you it’s in the catalog. Go to it:

Healthcare marketing plans

If you try a keyword search, there are just six results. Very good, except that none match.

Now, I’m sure about half of you are totally frustrated. The other half entered the title as Health Care Marketing Plans, found the book with no trouble and are halfway through it.

Yes, it makes a difference whether you enter “health care” or “healthcare”. Or pairs like “labor / labour”, “color / colour”, “counselling / counseling”, and so on. The computer is unfailingly literal, and the exact word or phrase must appear in the catalog entry before it winds up in your search results.

The bad news is that you have to remember this stuff. The good news is that you don’t have to do two searches every time you’re looking for a health care / healthcare topic. The Power search option is made for this problem, since part of the search can link the two variant forms with an “OR”, ensuring either will be retrieved.

Yes, at times searching the catalog is like being “IT” in a never-ending game of Hide-and-Go-Seek. But if the material is there, you can find it with a little thought, a little luck, and a helpful librarian.

 

David Moody, Librarian

Searching DOIs in Google, Bing or Other Search Engines

Last week’s Librarian blog was about finding a journal article by searching its DOI using the Library’s journal finder.  But you can also use a search engine, such as Google or Bing, to find an article by its DOI.

As discussed in last week’s blog, a DOI, or Digital Object Identifier, is a unique number given to an article to provide a persistent link to its location on the internet. The DOI is typically located on the first page of an article.

You may search the DOI in Google, Bing or another search engine.

For example, type DOI: 10.3102/003465430298571 in Google.Google DOI

The tricky part comes when you must guess which database UDM is likely to subscribe to. Clicking the first reference…

Google DOI#2

takes you to the homepage of the Sage journal: Review of Educational Research.(Note “sagepub” in the URL.) Once there you will find the full text free!

Google DOI#3

Remember: not all articles have a DOI and not all databases allow DOI searching.

New DOI Search Feature

Have you ever seen a DOI on an article and wondered what it was? DOI, or Digital Object Identifier, is a unique number given to an article to provide a persistent link to its location on the internet. The DOI is typically located on the first page of an article.

A new feature of the Full Text Journal Finder tool allows you to search using the article’s DOI.

Go to research.udmercy.edu, click Articles, Journals + Databases, scroll down to “Find online journals by title,” click SEARCH.

Type the DOI numbers (do not type DOI) in the third search box.  For example:

DOI

 

Click Search.

You are now taken to the homepage of the journal: Review of Educational Research. As long as UDM subscribes to the journal, you will find the full text free!

DOI This Article

 

Always select the PDF as it is a photocopy of the article.  You will obtain all the charts, graphs, or photos in the paper as well as the original pagination.

However, be advised that not all articles have a DOI and not all databases allow DOI searching.

IEEE Xplore Digital Library

Need to find information in electrical and computer engineering? Even information on medical or dental applications? Try IEEE Xplore. This database offers basic and advanced searching in almost four million records, including conference publications, standards, journals, and magazines published by the IEEE. Only abstracts are available.
Topics include:
Aerospace
Bioengineering
Communication, Networking, and Broadcasting
Components, Circuits, Devices, and Systems
Engineering Materials
Engineering Profession
Fields, Waves, & Electromagnetics
General Topics for Engineers
Geoscience
Nuclear Engineering
Photonics & Electo Optics
Power Energy & Industrial Applications
Robots and Control Systems
Signal Processing and Analysis
Transportation

Go to http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/Xplore/home.jsp

Don’t Stress Over Citations!

Drummer Boy MilitaryI hope by now that it’s been drummed into your heads, the need to properly document where, and how you found the information that you’re using within your papers. If it’s not common knowledge, and is not of your own creation; i.e. the words and ideas are those of another person, or organization, then you need to give proper credit. Citing where those words and ideas originally came from, where they were published, what journal, magazine, or website, can often seem like a daunting task. But, rest assured, the staff of the library are here to help.

If you’re getting into some deep research, or maybe you just want a powerful tool that can help keep track of your sources and create entire bibliographies, then check out RefWorks. RefWorks is a web-based database and bibliography creator. RefWorks users can import references from online databases and use these references in writing their papers and automatically format the bibliography and paper in seconds. When signing up for your individual account, you will need to use your UDM email address and the following group code: RWUDetroitMer. It might be worth your time to check out some of the available tutorials.

You might be thinking to yourself, “That’s great! But, I don’t really need all that.” So…maybe you just want something that can help generate correct citations in the format of your choice. Then try out one of these:

Lastly, you can Ask A Librarian. But please, please don’t consider your friendly librarian the last resort! Librarians can be invaluable in helping you find resources, and in helping you document those sources. Good luck and hope to see you at the reference desk.

FROM THE RESEARCH DESK: InfoTrac Newsstand

newsstandHard to believe, but there once was a time when you could visit the corner newspaper stand and find daily (sometimes twice daily) newspapers from the immediate vicinity as well as national and even international publications providing different perspectives on important events and people. Well, the good ‘ole days aren’t completely gone thanks to the MeL Database  InfoTrac Newsstand.

InfoTrac Newsstand provides access to full-text newspapers and allows users to search articles by title, headline, date and other fields. Over 1,100 publications in various formats and languages are included with coverage variously ranging from 1980 to the present. Search results can be narrowed by publication title, date, section (Business, Opinion and Editorial, Lifestyle, etc.), even Lexile Score, and more. Investor’s Business Daily, The Guardian, Michigan Chronicle, Christian Science Monitor, Toronto Star, and
USA Today are some of the titles included.

Helpful tools will allow you to generate citations for articles in multiple formats (e.g. MLA, APA), listen to articles, and translate articles into different languages. If your searches are getting too many results, the convenient Topic Finder tool will help you focus your search.  topic finder

InfoTrac Newsstand is a one-stop source for current news and searchable archived news. Keep InfoTrac Newsstand in mind the next time you  are looking for the world view as covered in the press.

 

 

 

 

 

Some text used with permission from Eunice Borelli and Deb Biggs Thomas, Michigan eLibrary, Library of Michigan.

Finding health statistics

chart image
Looking for health related stats can be a daunting task. There’s so much info out there, how do you find the right fact?

 

CDC logoThe good news is lots of reliable info is freely available through various federal government sites.  Many have tutorials to help with use of the data.

 

A good place to start is the National Center for Health Statistics site maintained by the CDC [Center for  Disease Control].

You can find birth, death, marriage and death stats at National Vital Statistics Reports  When the President mentioned in the recent State of the Union address that teen pregnancy is declining, this is where that info likely came from.

 

Check out the MMWR – Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report  for data on   influenza activity throughout the United States. An explanation of reportable diseases can be found here as well.

Another useful undertaking of the CDC/NCHS is the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey or NHNES.   This is an ongoing program of studies to access the health of adults and children.  Use of dietary supplements, nut consumption among adults — it’s all here.

 Health Data Interactive  provides downloadable tables of data on infants, children, adolescents, adults, and older adults. Tables can be customized by age, gender, race/ethnicity, and geographic location to explore different trends and patterns. [from the website]

If you like reading the dictionary — wait, doesn’t everyone? — it’s easy to get lost following all the information available.  Remember if you need any help finding or using this data see a librarian.

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